What if your tooth that has been knocked out of your mouth?

Some steps in caring for a tooth that has been knocked out of your mouth include: Only pick up the tooth by the chewing surface not the root🦷; If it’s dirty,  rinse lightly with water💦. It’s important not to dry, scrub or use toothpaste or soap on the tooth also don’t wrap in any cloth👎🏻; try to place the tooth back in the socket, if you can’t, keep the tooth moist at all times by either letting it soak in a cup of milk 🥛or tucking it inside your mouth between your cheek and your gum👄; lastly, and most importantly, see a dentist as soon as possible⏳. Ideally within 30 minutes of the incident. It is possible a tooth can be saved even if it’s outside the mouth for about an hour😁. #smilecare #brokentooth #repairyoursmile #welovetohelp #drstephendeehan #smiledaily😊 #oraltips #oralhealthtips #oralhealthcare #oralcare #smilemore

Poor oral health linked to a 75% increase in liver cancer risk, new study finds

The study, by researchers at Queen’s University Belfast, analyzed a large cohort of over 469,000 people in the UK, investigated the association between oral health conditions and the risk of a number of gastrointestinal cancers, including liver, colon, rectum and pancreatic cancer. Models were applied to estimate the relationship between cancer risk and self-reported oral health conditions, such as painful or bleeding gums, mouth ulcers, and loose teeth.

Whilst no significant associations were observed on the risk of the majority  and poor oral health, a substantial link was found for hepatobiliary cancer.

“Poor oral health has been associated with the risk of several chronic diseases, such as , stroke, and diabetes”, explained Dr. Haydée WT Jordão, from the Centre of Public Health at Queen’s University Belfast and lead author of the study. “However, there is inconsistent evidence on the association between poor oral health and specific types of gastrointestinal cancers, which is what our research aimed to examine.”

Read more at https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-06-poor-oral-health-linked-liver.html