JADA Study Finds Association Between Sugary Drinks, Erosive Tooth Wear

JADA Study Finds Association Between Sugary Drinks, Erosive Tooth Wear

coca-cola-462776_640 PRNewswire (1/25) hosts a release from the American Dental Association stating new research from The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) shows that sugary drinks are associated with erosive tooth wear among teenagers in Mexico. After providing a food questionnaire to teenagers living in Mexico, the study authors examined the teenagers for erosive tooth wear, finding the overall prevalence of erosive tooth wear was 31.7 percent, with sweet carbonated drinks – soda – causing the most erosion. JADA editor Michael Glick, D.M.D., said, “The oral health of children is always top of mind, and we’ve seen recently that sugar is a leading problem when it comes to their overall health and dental health.” Glick adds, “This study shows an association between high intake of sweet drinks and poor oral health. This issue needs to be taken seriously.”MouthHealthy.org provides additional information on how nutrition affects children’s teeth

Why is Oral Health Important for Men?

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Men are less likely than women to take care of their physical health and, according to surveys and studies, their oral health is equally ignored. Good oral health recently has been linked with longevity. Yet, one of the most common factors associated with infrequent dental checkups is just being male. Men are less likely than women to seek preventive dental care and often neglect their oral health for years, visiting a dentist only when a problem arises. When it comes to oral health, statistics show that the average man brushes his teeth 1.9 times a day and will lose 5.4 teeth by age 72. If he smokes, he can plan on losing 12 teeth by age 72. Men are also more likely to develop oral and throat cancer and periodontal (gum) disease.

Read more here: http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=m&iid=312&aid=1266

Children and Tooth Decay: Three Bad Habits

As a parent, you try to do the right things for your kids. In addition to taking your little ones to regularly scheduled doctor appointments, packing healthy lunches and making sure your kids get enough exercise, it’s your top priority to help your children grow up happy and healthy as best you can. You should also make sure your family’s daily habits are not taking a toll on your kids’ dental health. Children and tooth decay don’t go together, so make sure you’re not unwittingly teaching your kids poor dental hygiene.

Read more at the original article:
http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/cavities/article/sw-281474979287817

5 Fruits That Are Good For Your Teeth

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  1. Apples stimulate the production of saliva, reducing tooth decay by lowering bacteria
  2. Bananas are packed with vitamins, minerals and potassium
  3. Watermelon is full of gum supporting Vitamin C
  4. Oranges can help control acidity levels in your mouth
  5. Strawberries are natural tooth whiteners that contain both an astringent and vitamin C